Exploring Bike-Shares In Other Cities

Bike-shares are exploding in Europe: 10,000 bikes in Paris, 1,500 in Barcelona, 2,000 and an additional 3,000 to come in Copenhagen. Check out our collection of bike-share pictures from all over the world, submitted to the NY Bike-Share Project by the people who ride.

PARIS
Name: Velib’
Launched: July, 2007
Bicycles: 10,000
Stations: 750
City population: 2.15 million
Number of citizens per bike: 215
Availability:
Year-round
Price structure: Riders can select a one-day card for €1, a weekly card for €5 or an annual card for €29. First half-hour is free. Additional half-hours are priced at €1, €2 and €4.
Technology: Smartcard
Operating company: JC Decaux
By far the largest bike-share program to-date, Paris plans to have installed over 10,000 bikes by July, 2007, and 20,000 by 2008. Mayor Bertrand Delanoe launched the Velib' network as part of his wide-reaching program to green Paris and reduce vehicular traffic in the central city. To help riders navigate the streets, maps and safety manuals in several languages will be available at every station.

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BARCELONA
Name: Bicing
Launched: March, 2007
Bicycles: 1,500
Stations: 100
City population: 1.5 million
Number of citizens per bike: 1,000
Availability: Year-round, 5am to midnight, 24 hours a day on Friday and Saturday.
Price structure: Riders must apply via mail for a swipe card and purchase an annual subscription for €24. First half-hour is free. Additional half-hours are priced at €.30, with a maximum rental time of two hours.
Technology: Smartcard, and optional credit card.
Operating company: Clear Channel Adshel
Like many bike-share programs, Bicing offers its users a Google mash-up, with the number of available bikes at every station updated in real-time. Barcelona is currently in the process of expanding its program to 3,000 bikes by the end of 2007. As of today, Bicing had attracted 62,000 registered users.

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STOCKHOLM
Name: Storstockholms Lokaltrafik (SL)
Launched: 2006
Bicycles: 1,000
Stations: 80
City population: 800,000
Number of citizens per bike: 80
Availability: April-November, 6 am to 6 pm (last bike can be taken at 5:59)
Price structure: Daily passes cost 25 kroner ($4.50), and season passes cost 200 kroner ($36). There is no fee to check out a bike, but penalties are imposed after a maximum rental time of three hours.
Technology: Smartcard
Operating company: Clear Channel Adshel
In 2006 Stockholm launched a congestion pricing program to charge motorists to enter the city center. It has since been recognized as one of the world’s most successful, and Sweden’s parliament voted in June, 2007, to make the charge permanent. Stockholm’s bike-share program has been lauded as a complimentary effort to attract those who might otherwise travel inside the city center by car.

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OSLO
Name: Citybike
Launched: 2003
Bicycles: 1,200
Stations: 100
City population: 475,000
Number of citizens per bike: 400
Availability: Year-round, 6 am to midnight
Price structure: Yearly subscription card, which is available for 70 kroner/year
Technology: Smartcard
Operating company: Clear Channel Adshel
Clear Channel Adshel has installed Citybikes in four Norwegian cities: Trondheim, Drammen, Bergen and Oslo. Citybike is fully funded by Clear Channel Adshel in exchange for street-furniture advertising contracts.

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COPENHAGEN
Name: Bycyklen
Launched: 1995
Bicycles: 2,000
Stations: 110
City population: 600,000
Number of citizens per bike: 400
Availability: April to November
Price structure: Riders deposit a 20 kroner coin into the bike handlebar to unlock it from the bike rack. Bikes may be rented for unlimited amounts of time, although they may not leave the designated boundary of the old city. The 20 kroner coin is returned when the bike is locked back into the rack.
Technology: Coin deposit
Operating company: City Bike Foundation of Copenhagen
Bycyklen bikes were designed to be simple (they are single-speed), durable and adjustable. They are also conspicuous. In fact, the program is supported in part by advertising placed on each of the bike wheels. Copenhagen has announced the goal of increasing to 5,000 bikes and enlarging the dedicated area.

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FRANKFURT
Name: Call a Bike
Launched: 2003
Bicycles: 720
Stations: 66
City population: 650,000
Number of citizens per bike: 900
Price structure: 8 cents per minute, with a maximum of €15 per day, and €60 per week.
Technology: Mobile phone
Operating company: Deutsche Bahn
Call a Bike is run in several German cities through a system of authentication codes that automatically locks and unlocks bikes. Residents can approach any Call-a-Bike bicycle at any major intersection within the city. If the green light is blinking on the lock, the bicycle is available. After registering oneself over the phone, the user calls the number displayed on the lock and is given a key code. Bikes can be returned to the network by locking to any fixed structure (except a traffic signal) and entering a new code into the lock.

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LYON
Name: Velo'v
Launched: 2005
Bicycles: 3,000
Stations: 350
City population: 450,000
Number of citizens per bike: 150
Availability: Year-round
Price structure: Rider must purchase either a long-term or short-term subscription card. First half-hour is free. Pricing then varies for each additional hour.
Technology: Smartcard
Operating company: JC Decaux
Three months after Velo’v launched, 15,000 users were taking 4,000 trips a day. Today, daily ridership reaches 30,000. Lyon intends to expand its fleet by an additional 1,000 bikes by the end of 2007, with the goal of having stations within 300 meters of every point in the city. JC Decaux absorbed all set-up and operating costs in exchange for a bus-shelter advertising contract.

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PAMPLONA
Name: nbici
Launched: July, 2007
Bicycles: 350
Stations: 20
City population: 200,000
Number of citizens per bike: 570
Availability: Year-round, 8am to 6pm (extended summer hours)
Price structure: First half-hour is free. Each additional half-hour costs €.50.
Technology: Smartcard
Operating company: Cemusa
Nbici is the newest addition to Europe’s bike-share network, having launched in early July. It is also Cemusa’s first foray into bike-sharing. Like most European bike-share programs, nbici is funded through an advertising contract. The City of Pamplona offered Cemusa control over 50 advertising panels, 40 clocks, 50 advertising fences and 29 posters in exchange for funding nbici in its entirety.

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